Practice Area: Discrimination

Age Discrimination

If you are over 40, federal and state statutes protect you from being discriminated against on the basis of your age. Under these laws, it is unlawful to discriminate against a person because of his or her age with respect to any term, condition, or privilege of employment.

If you have experienced some kind of adverse employment action through age discrimination, whether it is a demotion, pay cut, or termination, your employer may have violated these statutes.

Race Discrimination

Employers may not discriminate against employees on the basis of their race or color.

If you have experienced some kind of adverse employment action on the basis of your race or color, your employer may have violated federal and state statutes that prohibit such racial discrimination.

Sex Discrimination

It is unlawful to discriminate against any employee because of his/her sex. Also prohibited are employment decisions based on stereotypes and assumptions about abilities, traits, or the performance of individuals on the basis of sex.

Pregnancy Discrimination

Discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes unlawful sex discrimination. Women who are pregnant or affected by related conditions must be treated in the same manner as other applicants or employees with similar abilities or limitations.

Equal Pay

All workers have the right to receive equal pay for equal work. As such, there are federal and state statutes that require employers to pay men and women equal salaries for equal work in the same establishment. While the jobs need not be identical, they must require substantially equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and must be performed under similar working conditions.

For workers who are disabled, finding and keeping employment can be difficult. Therefore, federal and state statutes protect qualified workers from being discriminated against on the basis of disability.

Disability Discrimination

An individual with a disability is a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, someone who has a prior record of having such an impairment, or someone who is regarded by others as having such an impairment.

A person is a qualified worker if he/she, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the job in question. Employers are required to make a reasonable accommodation so long as it does not pose an “undue hardship” to the employer.

If you have experienced some kind of adverse employment action, whether it be a demotion, pay cut, or termination, on the basis of a disability, or your employer has refused to provide a reasonable accommodation, your employer may have violated these statutes.

National Origin

Regardless of ancestry, all workers are entitled to the same employment opportunities as anyone else.

National origin discrimination occurs when a person is treated less favorably because he/she comes from a particular place, because of his/her ethnicity or accent, or because it is believed that he/she has a particular ethnic background.

National origin discrimination does not occur on the basis of citizenship. If you have experienced some kind of adverse employment action, whether it be a demotion, pay cut, or termination, on the basis of your national origin, your employer may have violated federal and state statutes prohibiting such discrimination.

Religion

Employers are prohibited from discriminating against individuals on the basis of religion.

Employers must reasonably accommodate employees’ sincerely held religious practices unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the employer. However, employers are not required to accommodate an employee’s religious practices if doing so would impose an undue hardship on the employers’ legitimate business interests.